Writing-Tools

More Transition to KM Tools

Posted on December 14, 2010. Filed under: Blogging, Life After Nano, twitter, Writer-Tools, Writing-Tools | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

First of all, all BOTD:  http://warriorwriters.wordpress.com/2010/12/13/structure-part-7-understanding-genre/

Found that blog via Twitter, and I thought it was an interesting read.  Not sure which of her three types of writer I belong in.  I think maybe I’m a “born” type, since everything I write is really some kind of variant on the “psychological thriller.”

That said, I have installed the Beta 4 of Scrivener.  No extensive testing, yet, for me as I continue the migration from Scrivener to my KM tools (including Treepad).  However, my plan (now) is to do this: (1) write daily using Scivener and using it as my main tool; (2) export that daily writing to my KM tools, (3) output (daily) from Scivener to Word (the whole enchilada); and (4) backup everything (Scrivener, Word, and KM tools).

Still haven’t written today, and may not restart until I’ve finished moving everything (done so far) into KM tools.  With my unfinished Nano novel, I can tell that I am in the middle of the plot, and I can see several viable endings.  This week, and December, are a bit weird, and I may be away for a week or longer at a time as other projects may pre-empt my writing.

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Scrivener Beta for Windows Expiration

Posted on December 11, 2010. Filed under: Life After Nano, Writer-Tools, Writing-Tools | Tags: , , , , , |

Just finished exporting my unfinished novel from Scrivener into Word 2007.

The Scrivener for Windows Beta claimed an expiration of December 12, 2010, tomorrow.  And, it also said that an upgrade would resolve that problem, with the commercial release to be early in 2011.  2011 is not here, yet, but the new beta has the same expiration date.

I spent yesterday’s “writing time” (my time allocated for writing) on researching this issue and installing the new beta release.  I’ve now spent today’s writing time on exporting the project.  Scrivener does have some excellent features for writers, but this problem does not leave me with much enthusiasm.

At this point, I am a little unsure as to whether or not I will stick with Word or start using one or two KM tools that I know are stable and predictable.  Maybe I’ll write it using Treepad.

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Starting to Pick Up Speed Again

Posted on November 16, 2010. Filed under: Staying-With-It, Writer-Tools, writing, Writing-Tools | Tags: , , , , , , , |

Devoted a fair amount of time to Nano today.  Have been learning a new program for writing: Scrivener.  Mostly just using it to write lately, but spent some of today learning its organizational tools, which are its strength.  Looks good so far.  Using the “full screen mode” seems to help my productivity; cranked out close to 2,000 words today.

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10 Great Resources for Writers

Posted on October 24, 2009. Filed under: Writer-Tools, Writing-Tools | Tags: , , , , |

While nosing around Twitter, #NaNoWriMo and #DFWRhinos, I came across 10 Great Resources for Writers.  Thought I would pass it on.

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Writing and GTD

Posted on April 26, 2009. Filed under: writing, Writing-Tools | Tags: , , , , |

Many writers and aspiring writers follow a system developed by David Allen and called “Getting Things Done.”  Popularly, this system is abbreviated to “GTD.”

If you have heard of it and are using it, then I am preaching to the choir.  If you have heard of it and discarded it, then I would like to know why.  The most persuasive argument I can find against GTD is that some things are “just too big” and require project management methodology (such as that described in the PMBOK).  But, <grin> even then you could use the concept from GTD of “delegation.”

Said differently, I think you can use GTD, and then have a “wrapper” around it of project management methodology and delegation for “things” that are too big.  And, I find that I must carefully monitor for “project overload.”

Most writers find GTD to be helpful, and I have my own personal variant which I constantly tune.  I also go back to the Mothership to see if some concept that was not useful before has suddenly become useful.  (That probably means I grew into it.)  (185 words per Pages)

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